Subway to accept NFC payments starting in October

Subway will soon allow customers to pay for their sandwiches with the tap of a smartphone.The sandwich franchise chain said Tuesday it will launch contactless NFC payments across more than 26,000 restaurants in the U.S. starting Oct. 1.The company is working with Softcard, a mobile payments joint venture operated by the big four cellular networks, to launch the system, but a Subway spokeswoman said that any payment app based on the NFC standard will be accepted. That includes the soon-to-be-launched Apple Pay and existing services from Google Wallet, PayPal and other vendors.The rollout will be one of the largest in the U.S. to date. When Apple CEO Tim Cook announced {Apple} Pay last week, he said there were 220,000 stores across the country that would accept the system. The Subway announce increases that by more than 10 percent in a single step.Subway has been testing NFC payments with Softcard in Salt Lake City since earlier this year.Softcard is operated by AT&T, T-Mobile, Sprint and Verizon. Until recently, it was called “Isis” but rebranded to avoid being confused with the terrorist group that is also called Islamic State.
See the original post here: Subway to accept NFC payments starting in October

Did you like this? Share it:

Go here to see the original: Subway to accept NFC payments starting in October

Here is the original post: Subway to accept NFC payments starting in October

Wikileaks outs latest FinFisher ‘government spyware’ that anti-virus can’t spot

Wikileaks has released what it claims are previously unknown fourth-generation versions of the controversial ‘government’ FinFisher spyware, lambasting the German Government for allowing it to be sold to “some of the most abusive regimes in the world.”In a media announcement fronted with statements from Ecuadorian embassy refugee and editor in chief Julian Assange himself, Wikileaks offered the files for a number of the spyware’s components, including Relay 4.3, Proxy 2.1, and Master 2.1, and zips containing ‘weaponised’ executables for the Windows FinSpy client used to monitor events such as a {{Skype}} conversation.The organisation said its motivation for releasing the files was to “challenge the secrecy and the lack of accountability of the surveillance industry,” a reference to the fact that this malware is legally used by a wide variety of governments, including repressive ones.“FinFisher continues to operate brazenly from Germany selling weaponised surveillance malware to some of the most abusive regimes in the world,” wrote Assange.“The Merkel government pretends to be concerned about privacy, but its actions speak otherwise. Why does the Merkel government continue to protect FinFisher? This full data release will help the technical community build tools to protect people from FinFisher including by tracking down its command and control centers.”Releasing files of malware looks more like a publicity stunt than a major help to the security industry, although it’s unlikely that many or even any of them would have detected it. That said, even if they now do, the makers of FinFisher can simply produce a new iteration if they haven’t already done so.Also released by Wikileaks is a bundle of mostly old and known documents, including cheap-looking Videos, dull brochures and support details. However, one eye-catching one is a spreadsheet from April 2014 laid out like a perverse antivirus test where almost every single product fails on almost every single count. For these anti-testers, a failure happens when a program detects FinFisher.This stands to underline how easy it now is to get past more or less any antivirus program going as long as the malware is new enough or the antivirus older. It is in fairness a tough job for security firms. FinFisher isn’t like conventional malware in that it is directed against tiny numbers of people spread across the globe. Spotting malware this rare is a task.Information taken from the cache also suggested that FinFisher had been used by 64 customers, with 171 licenses issued. That doesn’t sound like a lot but this is a very very expensive piece of software and a license gives a lot of use. Wikileaks reckons that it has generated revenue of at up to $100 million and counting.Governments it said had used it – identified through support requests – included Slovakia, Mongolia, Qatar, South Africa, Bahrain, Pakistan, Estonia, Vietnam, Belgium, Nigeria, Netherlands, PCS Security in Singapore, Bangladesh, Hungary, Italy, Bosnia & Herzegovina, and even Australia’s NSW state Police, Wikileaks said.Wikileaks describes Gamma International as being a German company but it’s not entirely clear that it’s that simple. The holding company, Lench IT solutions, has a UK subsidiary (where the company started), Gamma International Ltd, but also a German equivalent, Gamma International GmbH. Mysterious.What we do know is that FinFisher is hugely popular. Too popular. It has also upset companies such as Mozilla which in 2013 sent the firm a cease and desist letter after discovering that the spyware was impersonating Firefox in order to infect targets.This story, “Wikileaks outs latest FinFisher ‘government spyware’ that anti-virus can’t spot” was originally published by Techworld.com .
View post: Wikileaks outs latest FinFisher ‘government spyware’ that anti-virus can’t spot

Did you like this? Share it:

Read the original post: Wikileaks outs latest FinFisher ‘government spyware’ that anti-virus can’t spot

Read more: Wikileaks outs latest FinFisher ‘government spyware’ that anti-virus can’t spot

Ig Nobels 2014: Science’s craziest night set for Thursday at Harvard

Ig Nobel Prize, Improbable ResearchThe annual Ig Nobel Prize ceremony, honoring inventions in science, medicine and technology that first make people laugh and then make them think, will be held this Thursday, Sept. 18 at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass.According to organizer Improbable Research:
Winners travel to the ceremony, at their own expense, from around the world to receive their prize from a group of genuine, genuinely bemused Nobel Laureates, in Harvard’s historic and largest theater. 1100 improbable persons fill the theatre, and the whole affair is broadcast live.
I’m pleased to announced that our own Jon Gold will be on hand to report on the festivities (limited tickets remain available for those of you who are local).The theme for this year’s event is Food, so whether the honorees will really have much to do with our sweet spot — enterprise networking — is iffy. But if one thing is true about Improbable Research’s annual event, the unexpected is to be expected. Here’s a look back at last year’s Ig Nobel Prize winners, including researchers who assessed the effect of listening to opera on heart transplant patients who are mice.
Read more here: Ig Nobels 2014: Science’s craziest night set for Thursday at Harvard

Did you like this? Share it:

Read more: Ig Nobels 2014: Science’s craziest night set for Thursday at Harvard

More here: Ig Nobels 2014: Science’s craziest night set for Thursday at Harvard

Software bugs most common cause for mobile Internet outages, study says

A growing number of mobile Internet outages were caused by bugs as networks become more software dependent.Ninety big outages affected fixed and mobile networks across Europe last year. Approximately half of those hit mobile Internet and mobile telephony services, according to a report published by Enisa (European Union Agency for Network and Information Security).A closer look at what caused the mobile Internet outages revealed that 40 percent happened because of software bugs, compared to 15 percent during 2012. The corresponding share for fixed Internet was just 9 percent.Mobile networks are becoming more software dependent and the telecom sector is becoming more IT-like where vendors launch software that isn’t as well tested as in the past, according to Sylvain Fabre, research director at Gartner.Hardware failures, power cuts and software misconfigurations were other common causes of mobile Internet outages.The problem isn’t just the number of incidents, but the number of people affected. The mobile Internet outages affected 1.4 million user connections on average, compared to 100,000 connections for fixed Internet connections.The only upside was that outages caused by software bugs were fixed in five hours on average.Incidents caused by fire and heavy snowfall had the longest duration at 86 hours and 62 hours, respectively. The average time for the 6 percent of incidents that were categorized as malicious attacks was also high at 53 hours. However, that figure was skewed by one unindentified incident that took almost a week to resolve, according to Enisa.Fixed services weren’t affected by as many incidents as mobile services. The difference was partly due to the fact that some of the affected components in mobile networks were more centrally located and therefore affected more users, Enisa said.The reason for the report’s existence is Article 13a of the EU Framework Directive. It forces providers of fixed and mobile Internet as well as telephony services to report incidences to local authorities. Incident reporting and discussing actual incidents is essential to understanding the risks and what can be improved, according to Enisa.
Go here to read the rest: Software bugs most common cause for mobile Internet outages, study says

Did you like this? Share it:

More: Software bugs most common cause for mobile Internet outages, study says

Go here to read the rest: Software bugs most common cause for mobile Internet outages, study says

Many Android devices vulnerable to session hijacking through the default browser

The default browser in Android versions older than 4.4 has a vulnerability that allows malicious websites to bypass a critical security mechanism and take control of a user’s authenticated sessions on other sites.The issue is a universal cross-site scripting flaw that stems from how the browser handles javascript: strings preceded by a null byte character. When encountering such a string, the browser fails to enforce the same-origin policy, a security control that prevents scripts running in the context of one site from interacting with the content of other websites.“What this means is, any arbitrary website (say, one controlled by a spammer or a spy) can peek into the contents of any other web page,” said Tod Beardsley, technical lead for the Metasploit Framework project, in a blog post Monday. “Imagine you went to an attacker’s site while you had your webmail open in another window — the attacker could scrape your e-mail data and see what your browser sees. Worse, he could snag a copy of your session cookie and hijack your session completely, and read and write webmail on your behalf.”The security flaw was discovered by independent security researcher Rafay Baloch, who published a proof-of-concept exploit on his blog Aug. 31. However, the bug’s disclosure remained largely unnoticed until the Metasploit team developed a module that can be used to steal authentication cookies from users who open a malicious page.“Research and testing is still ongoing to plumb the depths of this issue,” Beardsley said. “We’d like to pin down exactly when the bug was fixed, and to determine just how widespread this vector really is. After all, pre-4.4 builds of Android account for about 75% of the total Android ecosystem today.”Users who believe they might be affected are advised to install and use one of the other browsers available for Android such as {{Google}} Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Dolphin Browser or Opera, which are not affected by this issue.
See the original post here: Many Android devices vulnerable to session hijacking through the default browser

Did you like this? Share it:

Go here to see the original: Many Android devices vulnerable to session hijacking through the default browser

Go here to see the original: Many Android devices vulnerable to session hijacking through the default browser

IBM wants to replace the spreadsheet with Watson Analytics

In an ongoing effort to commercialize its Watson analysis technology, IBM is testing a new service that can answer questions business managers might have about their data.On Tuesday, IBM launched a beta of Watson Analytics, an interactive Q&A service designed to answer questions and highlight trends within sets of enterprise data.The service “is about putting powerful analytics in the hands of every business user,” said Eric Sall, IBM vice president of marketing for business analytics.Traditional business intelligence tools remain too difficult to use for business managers, Sall said. “It is hard to get the data. It is hard to analyze the data if your not a specialist, and it is hard to use the tools,” he said. Watson Analytics attempts to streamline the process.Natural language systems are becoming increasingly prevalent as a form of human-computer interface. Apple’s Siri, Google’s GoogleNow and Microsoft inc’s Cortana all act as virtualized personal assistants, able to answer a range of simple questions on behalf of their users.Watson Analytics operates in a similar manner, in that it can offer responses to questions posed by the user in their chosen language, rather than forcing the user to develop a SQL query, master a complex statistical package or write data-parsing code to better understand some large set of data.The effort is the latest move in IBM’s US$1 billion initiative to commercialize Watson technologies.IBM Research developed Watson to compete with human contestants on the “Jeopardy” game show in 2011, using natural language processing and analytics, as well as many sources of structured and unstructured data, to formulate responses to the show’s questions.In the years since, the company has been working to commercialize the Watson technology by identifying industries that could benefit from this form of cognitive computing, such as health care, law enforcement and finance.Earlier this year, IBM launched the Watson Discovery Advisor, which is customized for scientific researchers who need to deeply probe one specific body of scientific knowledge, such as chemistry or cellular biology.Another service, the company’s Watson Engagement Advisor, uses the artificial intelligence technology to aid in customer support.Watson Analytics is aimed more to answer more general questions for the average business manager. The technology would be a good fit for those working in the marketing, sales, operations, finance and human resources professions, according to IBM.The service is aimed at business users who now do most of their analysis on spreadsheets, or use traditional business intelligence tools.A sales manager could determine, for instance, which pending deals are most likely to close. A human resources manager could investigate which benefits are most likely to keep employees from job hunting elsewhere.The service streamlines a lot of the tasks typically associated with predictive analytics, noted Dan Vesset, who is the program vice president for business analytics at the IDC IT research firm.For instance, Watson Analytics can clean a new data set, which is to say the service organizes and formats the data so it can be analyzed. This can be a cumbersome job to do by hand. IBM estimates that data preparation can take up to 60 percent of the time required for an analysis job.IBM is expecting most of the user data will arrive in a structured format, as database tables. The company is working on connectors for piping in semi-structured data, such as data from other applications and services like Salesforce.com, Sall said.The service can also examine a data set to determine which statistical algorithms and visualization would work best for that data, relieving the user from making such technical decisions, Vesset said.“I think IBM is bringing together a lot of important components,” Vesset said, referring to how the service combines natural language processing, machine learning, cognitive reasoning, data cleansing and formatting, preparatory analysis and visualization.“Instead of dragging and dropping a pie chart, you write in natural language what you’d like to see, and the system itself will provide what it reasons is the most appropriate visualization,” Vesset said.IBM’s next step, Vesset said, is to find the right user base for this service. The company is not pitching Watson Analytics to IT managers, but rather to line of business managers, who all have very specific domain knowledge about their businesses, which IBM and its partners will need to understand closely to make Watson a fit, he said.IBM also has a range of more traditional analysis software and services, such as the Cognos Business Intelligence Suite and SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences).IBM will choose which applicants can try the beta. In November, the service will go live.The pricing structure for Watson Analytics not been announced yet, though the company plans to offer free use of the service for light, exploratory tasks, and offer paid plans for larger-scale usage.IBM plans to demonstrate how the technology works in more detail, in an event to be held in New York on Tuesday.
Here is the original post: IBM wants to replace the spreadsheet with Watson Analytics

Did you like this? Share it:

Link: IBM wants to replace the spreadsheet with Watson Analytics

See the article here: IBM wants to replace the spreadsheet with Watson Analytics

How to Choose the Best Vulnerability Scanning Tool for Your Business

A vulnerability scanner, as its name implies, scans your network or system (such as a computer, server or router) and identifies and reports back on open ports, active Internet Protocol (IP) addresses and log-ons, not to mention operating systems, software and services that are installed and running. The scanner software compares the information it finds against known vulnerabilities in its database or a third-party database such as CVE, OVAL, OSVDB or the SANS Institute/FBI Top 20.A scanner typically prioritizes known vulnerabilities as critical, major or minor. The beauty of a vulnerability scanner is that it can detect malicious services such as Trojans that are listening in on the ports of a system.+ ALSO ON NETWORK WORLD 6 free network vulnerability scanners +Not all scanners are equal, though. Many low-end and free vulnerability scanners simply scan a network or system and provide remedial reporting; more feature-rich tools incorporate patch management and penetration testing, among other components. However, many scanners – low-end or high-end – suffer from false-positives and false-negatives. A false-positive generally results in an administrator chasing down information about an issue that doesn’t exist. A false-negative is more serious, as it means the scanner failed to identify or report something that poses a serious security risk.[ Feature: 10 Security Nightmares Revealed at Black Hat and Def Con ]When researching vulnerability scanners, it’s important to find out how they’re rated for accuracy (the most important metric) as well as reliability, scalability and reporting. If accuracy is lacking, you’ll end up running two different scanners, hoping that one picks up vulnerabilities that the other misses. This adds cost and effort to the scanning process. Not only is an IT staffer spending double the time on the scanning process itself; she’s also combing through two sets of scanning results to see what’s what.Software-Based Vulnerability Scanners: Targeted Reports From Various DevicesSome of the best-known and more highly rated commercial vulnerability scanners are Nessus (Tenable Network Security), Secunia CSI and Core Impact (Core Security). Nessus started as a free tool but was eventually converted to a commercial product, with a beefed-up feature set and higher quality tech support. Secunia is free for personal use and affordable for commercial use. Core Impact is pricey ($40,000 and up) but offers terrific value for the money.These types of scanning products generally include configuration auditing, target profiling, penetration testing and detailed vulnerability analysis. They integrate with Windows products, such as Microsoft inc System Center, to provide intelligent patch management; some work with mobile device managers. They can scan not only physical network devices, servers and workstations, but extend to virtual machines, BYOD mobile devices and databases. Some products, such as Core Impact, integrate with other existing scanners, enabling you to import and validate scan results.Software-based scanners also require much less administration than their counterparts from 10 years ago, or low-end tools of today, thanks to greatly improved user interfaces and targeted analysis reports with clear remediation actions. Reporting functionality lets you sort on many different criteria, including vulnerability and host, and see trends in changes over time.Cloud-Based Vulnerability Scanners: Continuous, On-Demand MonitoringA newer type of vulnerability scanner is delivered on-demand as Software as a Service (SaaS). Products such as Qualys Vulnerability Management provide continuous, hands-free monitoring of all computers and devices on all network segments (perimeter to internal). They can also scan cloud services such as Amazon EC2. With an on-demand scanner, there’s no installation, manual integration or maintenance required – just subscribe to the service and configure your scans.[ Survey: IT Needs to Address Cloud Security ]“Maintenance-free” means that the scanner service tunes and tweaks the scanning engine, and tests and verifies that definition lists are current, to reduce the occurrence of false-positives and false-negatives.Like software-based scanners, on-demand scanners incorporate links for downloading vendor patches and updates for identified vulnerabilities, reducing remediation effort. These services also include scanning thresholds to prevent overloading devices during the scanning process, which can cause devices to crash.For targeted scanning and reporting purposes, the Qualys product in particular lets you group and tag hosts by location or business unit. It also provides a form of risk-based prioritization by correlating a business impact to each asset, so you know which vulnerabilities to tackle first.Too Many Threats Out There to Avoid Vulnerability ManagementVulnerability scanning is a must for medium-size to enterprise environments, considering the large number of network segments, routers, firewalls, servers and other business devices in use. The attack surface is simply too spacious (and inviting to malicious attackers) not to scan regularly.[ Reviews: New Security Tools From Tenable, HP, Co3 Attempt the Impossible ]Compliance is also an important issue. For organizations that must adhere to stringent IT rules to meet regulations such as PCI DSS, HIPAA and GLBA, for example, vulnerability scanning is part and parcel of doing business.Smaller organizations or environments could have a tough time affording the full-featured vulnerability scanners, which can run from $1,000 to $1,500 at a minimum for an annual license. (The costs run into the tens of thousands for some scanners in an enterprise.) That said, it’s a relatively small price to pay for on-demand or hands-free vulnerability management with detailed reporting. It would cost far more to pay a staff member to run regular scans and interpret the volume of generated data the old-fashioned (and labor-intensive) way.This story, “How to Choose the Best Vulnerability Scanning Tool for Your Business” was originally published by CIO .
Continue reading here: How to Choose the Best Vulnerability Scanning Tool for Your Business

Did you like this? Share it:

Read the rest here: How to Choose the Best Vulnerability Scanning Tool for Your Business

See original here: How to Choose the Best Vulnerability Scanning Tool for Your Business

Apple issues third OS X Yosemite public beta

Apple yesterday released the third public beta of OS X Yosemite, shipping the preview a few days earlier than expected.The update, labeled build “14A361p,” accompanied the debut of the eighth developer preview, also on Monday. The latter was available only to registered developers, who pay $99 annually for access to pre-release software so that they can begin building new apps and modify existing ones for what Apple also calls OS X 10.10.This week’s eighth developer preview and third public beta are nearly identical in content and operation. The former was tagged as build “14A361c.”Last month, Computerworld forecast that Apple would release the third public beta on Thursday, Sept. 18, assuming that the last two builds exposed a pattern of issuing the public beta three days after every other developer preview.The slight change of timing may mean little or nothing, or could signal that Apple plans on squeezing one more public beta into the process before it locks down the code for a “gold master,” or GM, the final pre-release version that is, for all intents, the polished code which will be offered to all.Bereft of an official ship date from Apple for Yosemite, the most likely would be Oct. 22, a date matching last year’s schedule with OS X Mavericks.An alternate explanation is that Apple wanted to refresh the Yosemite public beta before Wednesday’s appearance of iOS 8. New features in OS X and iOS, called “Continuity,” will allow customers who own both Macs and iPhones or iPads to hand off in-progress tasks, like a half-finished document or email, from one device to another. Other Continuity components include receipt of text messages on Macs, taking and receiving phone calls from the Mac, and an instant ad hoc Wi-Fi hotspot triggered when an iPhone is near a connection-less Mac.The text message handoff will not be implemented in iOS 8 off the bat; Apple has said that an update to the mobile operating system will add the functionality in October.This summer’s Yosemite public beta was the first for an Apple operating system since 2000, when the company charged customers $29.95 for the privilege of running an early version of what later became OS X 10.0, better known as Cheetah.The public beta can be installed only on Macs running OS X Mavericks. Those machines can include iMacs from the mid-2007 model on; 13-in. MacBooks from late 2008 (aluminum case) or early 2009 (plastic case) forward; MacBook Pros from mid- and late-2007 and on; MacBook Airs from late 2008 and later; Mac Minis from early 2009 and after; and Mac Pros from early 2008 and later.Most Macs will be able to upgrade immediately upon Yosemite’s launch: According to analytics vendor Net Applications, approximately 67% of all Macs will be running Mavericks by the end of this month.Participants in the public beta will be able to install the final edition in place of the preview when the former ships next month. Yosemite, like its predecessor Mavericks, will be free to download from the Mac App Store when it finalizes.The third Yosemite public beta can be retrieved by those already running the preview from the Mac App Store by selecting “Software Update…” from the Apple menu on the top-of-the-screen menu bar.This story, “spintax{Apple} issues third OS X Yosemite public beta” was originally published by Computerworld .
More: Apple issues third OS X Yosemite public beta

Did you like this? Share it:

Read the original post: Apple issues third OS X Yosemite public beta

Read more: Apple issues third OS X Yosemite public beta

Apple issues third OS X Yosemite public beta

Apple yesterday released the third public beta of OS X Yosemite, shipping the preview a few days earlier than expected.The update, labeled build “14A361p,” accompanied the debut of the eighth developer preview, also on Monday. The latter was available only to registered developers, who pay $99 annually for access to pre-release software so that they can begin building new apps and modify existing ones for what Apple also calls OS X 10.10.This week’s eighth developer preview and third public beta are nearly identical in content and operation. The former was tagged as build “14A361c.”Last month, Computerworld forecast that Apple would release the third public beta on Thursday, Sept. 18, assuming that the last two builds exposed a pattern of issuing the public beta three days after every other developer preview.The slight change of timing may mean little or nothing, or could signal that Apple plans on squeezing one more public beta into the process before it locks down the code for a “gold master,” or GM, the final pre-release version that is, for all intents, the polished code which will be offered to all.Bereft of an official ship date from Apple for Yosemite, the most likely would be Oct. 22, a date matching last year’s schedule with OS X Mavericks.An alternate explanation is that Apple wanted to refresh the Yosemite public beta before Wednesday’s appearance of iOS 8. New features in OS X and iOS, called “Continuity,” will allow customers who own both Macs and iPhones or iPads to hand off in-progress tasks, like a half-finished document or email, from one device to another. Other Continuity components include receipt of text messages on Macs, taking and receiving phone calls from the Mac, and an instant ad hoc Wi-Fi hotspot triggered when an iPhone is near a connection-less Mac.The text message handoff will not be implemented in iOS 8 off the bat; Apple has said that an update to the mobile operating system will add the functionality in October.This summer’s Yosemite public beta was the first for an Apple operating system since 2000, when the company charged customers $29.95 for the privilege of running an early version of what later became OS X 10.0, better known as Cheetah.The public beta can be installed only on Macs running OS X Mavericks. Those machines can include iMacs from the mid-2007 model on; 13-in. MacBooks from late 2008 (aluminum case) or early 2009 (plastic case) forward; MacBook Pros from mid- and late-2007 and on; MacBook Airs from late 2008 and later; Mac Minis from early 2009 and after; and Mac Pros from early 2008 and later.Most Macs will be able to upgrade immediately upon Yosemite’s launch: According to analytics vendor Net Applications, approximately 67% of all Macs will be running Mavericks by the end of this month.Participants in the public beta will be able to install the final edition in place of the preview when the former ships next month. Yosemite, like its predecessor Mavericks, will be free to download from the Mac App Store when it finalizes.The third Yosemite public beta can be retrieved by those already running the preview from the Mac App Store by selecting “Software Update…” from the Apple menu on the top-of-the-screen menu bar.This story, “spintax{Apple} issues third OS X Yosemite public beta” was originally published by Computerworld .
More: Apple issues third OS X Yosemite public beta

Did you like this? Share it:

Read the original post: Apple issues third OS X Yosemite public beta

See more here: Apple issues third OS X Yosemite public beta

Intel teams with Indian firm to launch ‘Eddy’ tablet for children

Intel has teamed with Indian education startup Metis Learning on an Android tablet that aims to keep children away from violent TV content and games on their parents’ smartphones.Targeted at children aged 2-10 years, Eddy is priced at Indian rupees 9999 (US$163), and comes with over 160 apps selected by educators and experts to accelerate a child’s social, emotional and cognitive development, Intel said.All content on the tablet is violence free, Intel said. The children’s market in India is seen as a large opportunity as most makers of tablets and other devices, targeting the education segment, have so far focused on higher education, said Bharat Gulia, co-founder of Metis.Eddy is initially targeted at children from middle and upper-middle class homes, with knowledge of English, but the plan is to also look at content in Indian languages.India’s tablet market was 860,000 units in the second quarter of this year, according to IDC. Android was the preferred operating system with close to 90 percent share.Eddy is powered by Intel’s Atom Processor Z2520 and runs Android 4.2.2 and a proprietary Athena operating system, developed by Metis, which enables parental controls including time discipline, usage reports and child-safe Internet browsing.The device has a scratch proof, impact resistant 7-inch multitouch capacitive 1024×600-pixel display, with a UV-ray protective layer to make it safe for childrens’ eyes. The tablet has an internal storage of 16GB which can be expanded to 32GB. It has 2-megapixels front and rear cameras.The tablet is being sold through Amazon India, and will have launch discounts and offers worth rupees 4,500. Eddy will be initially sold exclusively online, but Metis plans to also sell it through brick-and-mortar stores, Gulia said.The tablets are being manufactured for Metis by a contract manufacturer in China. The company expects sales of about 400,000 yearly.
View original post here: Intel teams with Indian firm to launch ‘Eddy’ tablet for children

Did you like this? Share it:

The rest is here: Intel teams with Indian firm to launch ‘Eddy’ tablet for children

See more here: Intel teams with Indian firm to launch ‘Eddy’ tablet for children